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Howden School

Howden School

Teaching & Learning

Literacy & Numeracy

The literacy and numeracy catch-up premium gives schools additional funding to support Year 7 students who did not achieve at least level 4 in reading and/or maths at the end of Key Stage 2 (KS2).

“Year 7 catch-up funding (government funding for those pupils entering secondary school with below average standards in English and mathematics) is helping to improve pupils’ literacy and mathematical skills well”.

“The school is promoting reading well. There are regular library lessons for younger pupils and a good choice of books to encourage pupils to read widely. Pupils say they enjoy reading. Computer systems are used to promote reading and check pupils’ understanding. Pupils were highly commended by the Speaker of the House of Commons for their work in helping to design the school library.” Ofsted 2016

How we spent the allocation of funds during 2017-18:

Literacy Catch up

The school uses its literacy catch up funding in a number of ways:

  • Maintain additional literacy time in the curriculum for a cohort of Year 7 students. Students in Year  7 receive 7 hours of English
  • Support of e-readers for library for targeted intervention
  • Maintain a programme of small group withdrawal sessions to support students in English
  • Continue to fund an intensive programme for the teaching of reading
  • Purchase Kindles to engage students particularly boys in reading
  • Part fund a suite of iPads to support the reading tests

 

Future spending 2019-2020

We intend to spend this year’s allocation by:

  • Embed the use of Sumdog software to support students
  • Expanding a programme of small group withdrawal sessions to support students in maths
  • Maintain additional literacy time in the curriculum for a cohort of Year 7 students. Students in Year 7 will continue to receive 7 hours of English a week compared to the 3 hours for the rest of Year 7
  • Support of e-readers for library for targeted intervention by purchasing additional reading material
  • Maintain a programme of small group withdrawal sessions to support students in English
  • Continue to fund an intensive programme for the teaching of reading

Impact

English

28 students entered the school with an English score of below 100 in their KS2 validated reading scores. The average increase in reading age of those students was 0.9 years or very close to one year’s progress on average per student. Of the students who entered the school with an English score of 100 or above the average improvement of reading ages was 0.4. Therefore students who came in at below 100 in their KS2 validated reading scores made on average twice the rate of progress in their reading scores than the rest of the school.

Progress Points

The progress made using progress points of the 28 students entered the school with an English score of below 100 in their KS2 validated reading scores is in line with the other students. We expect their progress in the next year to be better than other students because of their improved reading scores.

Impact

Maths

27 students entered the school with a Maths score of below 100 in their KS2 validated results. The progress made using progress points of the 27 students entered the school with a Maths score of below 100 in their KS2 validated scores is in line with the other students. We expect their progress in the next year to be better than other students because they have narrowed the progress gap.